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Revista médica de Chile

versión impresa ISSN 0034-9887

Resumen

CSENDES J, Attila; CSENDES G, Paula; ROJAS C, Jorge  y  SANCHEZ R, Marcos. Clinical status of patients subjected to cholecystectomy ten years ago. Rev. méd. Chile [online]. 2000, vol.128, n.12, pp.1309-1312. ISSN 0034-9887.  http://dx.doi.org/10.4067/S0034-98872000001200001.

Background: The "post cholecystectomy" syndrome comprises a series of vague symptoms referred by patients subjected to this surgical procedure. These symptoms are unspecific and their association with the operation is dubious. Aim: To assess the frequency of digestive symptoms among patients subjected to a cholecystectomy ten years ago. Patients and methods: One hundred patients subjected to a cholecystectomy between 1987 and 1990, were contacted by mail. They were invited to a clinical interview and to an abdominal ultrasound examination. Results: Two invited patients had died of an acute myocardial infarction. Therefore, 98 patients (78 women), aged 30 to 85 years old, were assessed. Seventy two percent had diverse dyspeptic symptoms, 90% had no food intolerance and 94% had gained weight after the operation. Ninety six percent was satisfied with the surgical results, 3% had severe symptoms due to gastroesophageal reflux or depression. One patient had a residual choledocholithiasis and refused any treatment. Conclusions: Cholecystectomy is well tolerated and has good long term results (Rev Méd Chile 2000; 128: 1309-12)

Palabras clave : Cholecystectomy; Cholelitiasis; Dyspepsia; Postcholecystectomy syndrome.

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