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Revista chilena de historia natural

Print version ISSN 0716-078X

Abstract

LOWENBERG-NETO, PETER; HASEYAMA, KIRSTERN L.F.  and  DE CARVALHO, CLAUDIO J.B.. Historical biogeography of the Fanniidae (Insecta, Diptera): A commentary on the age of the family. Rev. chil. hist. nat. [online]. 2012, vol.85, n.3, pp.335-338. ISSN 0716-078X.  http://dx.doi.org/10.4067/S0716-078X2012000300007.

In a study on Fanniidae biogeography, Dominguez & Roig-Juñent (2011) argued that the family had a Pangeic origin, Late Jurassic/early Cretaceous (~146 Ma). However, recent literature on Diptera supports that Schizophora radiation occurred during Cenozoic. Fanniidae is a widespread taxon and it was interpreted under the maximum vicariance paradigm; the consequence was an analysis with no alternative hypothesis, but Pangeic origin. We verified that Fanniidae historical narrative was incongruent with the Gondwana sequential break-up. A second analysis, assuming the Fanniidae origin during early Paleocene (65 Ma), showed congruence with recent geological events and with the Muscidae diversification, a closely related Muscoidea family. Our hypothesis suggests that the Fanniidae originated in Paleogene and they were affected by few events of vicariance and several expansions during Cenozoic.

Keywords : BPA; DIVA; molecular clock; TreeFitter.

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