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Revista chilena de infectología

Print version ISSN 0716-1018

Abstract

ROSANOVA, María T et al. Descriptive study of bone and joint infections in children in times of community-acquired methicillin- resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA). Rev. chil. infectol. [online]. 2015, vol.32, n.3, pp.321-325. ISSN 0716-1018.  http://dx.doi.org/10.4067/S0716-10182015000400010.

Background: Bone and joint infections (BJI) are relatively common in children, and community -acquired methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) is the leading cause in some countries. Aim: To evaluate epidemiological data, clinical and microbiological features and outcome of BJI. Methods: A prospective descriptive study was conducted. Results: 40 patients (p) completed the study. Bacterial cultures were positives in 30 p (75%): CA-MRSA was found in 19 p, methicillin-sensitive S. aureus in 6 p, and others in 5 p. Cultures were negatives in 10 p (25%). Median treatment duration was 28 days (r: 21-40 d); Analyzing patients with CA-MRSA positive cultures separately, initial CRP was higher (Md 76 vs 50 mg/L, p < 0.02), normalization occurred later (Md 14 days vs 7days, p < 0.03), and duration of treatment (Md 32 days vs 23, p < 0.004) as well as hospital stay (Md 9 days vs 7, p = 0.12) were longer. Sequelae were present in 3 p and 1 relapsed: All of them with CA-SAMR. Conclusion: CA-MRSA was the leading cause of BJI and was associated with higher CRP on admission, later normalization and longer treatment duration. Complications as drainage requirement, and sequelae were common in those p.

Keywords : Community-acquired methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus; bone and joint infections; children.

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