33 2Variación genética en Nothofagus (subgénero Nothofagus)Fuentes documentales para el estudio del clima en la región sur-austral de Chile (40º - 51º S) durante los últimos siglos 
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Bosque (Valdivia)

 ISSN 0717-9200

MORALES, Rodrigo; SANFUENTES, Eugenio; VIVES, Isabel    MOLINA, Eduardo. Phaeocryptopus gaeumannii, pathogen causing the "swiss needle cast" in Pseudotsuga menziesii: biology background, control measures and situation in Chile. Bosque (Valdivia) []. 2012, 33, 2, pp.127-134. ISSN 0717-9200.  http://dx.doi.org/10.4067/S0717-92002012000200002.

Swiss needle cast is a disease caused by Phaeocryptopus gaeumannii, a fungal pathogen causing severe defoliation in Pseudotsuga menziesii (Douglas fir) in some countries of the world, leading to losses in the volume of timber harvesting. This pathogen is distributed in the native range of P. menziesii in North America (U.S., Canada and Mexico) and has been introduced in Europe, New Zealand, Turkey and, recently, in Chile. Currently the country has an area larger than 16,000 ha of plantations of P. menziesii, which are increasing because it is a potentially productive species considered in species diversification programs. In Chile P. gaeumannii is distributed from the region of La Araucanía to Los Lagos, focusing on these areas the largest area of Douglas fir in the country (70 % approximately). The aim of this review was to examine studies related to biology and life cycle of the pathogen, epidemiology and infection processes, impact on plantations and control measures implemented in the different countries affected by this pathogen, in order to have a background take on the first studies to Chile, a referent to basic and applied research for the country.

: Phaeocryptopus gaeumannii; Pseudotsuga menziesii; volumetric losses timber distribution the SNC in Chile.

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