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vol.22 issue2THE CONTRIBUTION OF THE AORTIC BRANCHES IN THE VASCULARIZATION OF CERVICAL REGIONS, DURING THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE NINE BANDED ARMADILLO (Dasypus Novemcinctus, L. 1758)ANATOMICAL CONSIDERATIONS OVER THE INTRINSIC MUSCULATURE OF THORACIC LIMB OF PUMA (Puma concolor) author indexsubject indexarticles search
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International Journal of Morphology

On-line version ISSN 0717-9502

Abstract

BUARQUE DE GUSMAO, Luiz Carlos; ALVES GUIMARAES, Vanessa  and  MEDEIROS DIEGUES JUNIOR, Inaldo de Albuquerque. FEMORAL TRIGON: WHAT IS THE REAL MEDIAL LIMIT?. Int. J. Morphol. [online]. 2004, vol.22, n.2, pp.119-120. ISSN 0717-9502.  http://dx.doi.org/10.4067/S0717-95022004000200003.

The femoral trigonus is a topographic triangle-shaped region located in the proximal third of the anterior aspect of the thigh, where femoral vessels, femoral nerve and its branches transit. The knowledge of its limits is very important for invasive procedures and for assessment of pathologies in this region. As far as the determination of the medial aspect of this triangle is concerned, literature diverges. Most authors state that this limit is the the medial edge of the Adductor lo2ngus muscle, while others assume it to be the lateral edge of the aforementioned muscle. In the present paper authors try to padronize the medial limit of this triangle. With this purpose, examinations were performed on individuals of both sexes and dissection on human corpses that were fixed in 10% formaldehyde. The femoral trigonus was delimitated by propedeutical methods of inspection and palpation and it was found that, in the living person, the lateral aspect of the Adductor longus muscle was easily palpated. Therefore the authors propose the padronization of the lateral edge of the Adductor longus muscle as the medial limit of the femoral trigonus and, as a consequence, this muscle should be excluded from the trigonus floor. The femoral trigonus is then assumed as a well-defined area where important vascular and nerve structures of the thigh are found

Keywords : Anatomy; Thigh; Lower limb.

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