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International Journal of Morphology

On-line version ISSN 0717-9502

Abstract

ESPINOZA-NAVARRO, O; DIAZ, J; RODRIGUEZ, H  and  MORENO, A. Effects of Altitude on Anthropometric and Physiological Patterns in Aymara and Non-Aymara Population Between 18 and 65 Years in the Province of Parinacota Chile (3.700 masl). Int. J. Morphol. [online]. 2011, vol.29, n.1, pp.34-40. ISSN 0717-9502.  http://dx.doi.org/10.4067/S0717-95022011000100005.

The aim of the study was to compare anthropometric and physiological patterns in a sample of 522 Aymara and non-Aymara individuals from Parinacota, Chile (3.700m). After signing voluntary informed consent forms, the residents were separated in two age groups. Groups A: 18 to 35 years, and Group B: 36 to 65 years, by sex and Aymara and non-Aymara ethnicity. The results of this study determined that anthropometric anteroposterior diameter (DAP) are higher in Aymara population. Biacromial diameter (DBA) is significantly lower in the Aymara population. Aymara males between 18 and 35 years are smaller than non-Aymara males. Aymara women had significantly lower heart rates. The respiratory rate is significantly lower in Aymara males and females from 18 to 35 years. Partial oxygen saturation (SaO2) is higher in Aymara women, compared with non-Aymara women. The body mass index (BMI) did not differ within each group according to age, however, in comparison between groups, older individuals independent of sex and ethnicity have index of overweight and obesity. In forced vital capacity (FVC), there is no difference in ages however, while comparing between ages, older populations independent of sex and ethnicity presented significant decreases in this parameter. This may reflect mechanisms of adaptation to the high altitude of Aymara native populations living in the Andes.

Keywords : Aymara; Altitude; Anthropometry; Physiological patterns.

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