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International Journal of Morphology

On-line version ISSN 0717-9502

Abstract

IHASZ, Ferenc et al. Body Composition Comparisons by Age Groups in Hungarian Adults. Int. J. Morphol. [online]. 2015, vol.33, n.3, pp.850-854. ISSN 0717-9502.  http://dx.doi.org/10.4067/S0717-95022015000300007.

The assessment of body composition provides a basis for evaluating changes in adults as they age. If the fat content is shown to be too high, intervention to reduce storage fat is warranted. The purpose of this paper is to report differences in body composition in men and women across three age groups (young, middle aged, older) to describe potential changes in both fat and muscularity. In addition, if fat storage is shown to be located in the visceral area (around the internal organs), then an addition risk to health would be evident. A total of 1564 Hungarian adults were tested for body mass index (BMI) and body composition using a multi-frequency electrical impedance device to determine percent body fat (PBF), percent muscularity (M%), and visceral fat area. Descriptive analyses were performed and Analyses of Variance were used to compare the mean values from each of the three groups. Post hoc comparisons were performed on significant findings. The results of this study indicate an increase in BMI, PBF, and visceral fat area and a decrease in M%. These differences were evident in young compared to middle-aged and older adults and between middle-aged and older adults. Levels of muscularity were significantly less as age increased. This resulted in no significant differences in BMI between middle-aged and older adults. This reduction in muscularity is alarming in that prior to expected age for sarcopenia, the middle-aged adults were showing declines in tissue that would benefit their quality of life. Longitudinal studies are needed to confirm these findings.

Keywords : Body composition; Age groups; Males; Females.

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