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vol.58 número4ARISTOLOCHIC ACIDS IN THE ROOTS OF ARISTOLOCHIA CHILENSIS, A DANGEROUS CHILEAN MEDICINAL PLANTFENTON REACTION DRIVEN BY IRON LIGANDS índice de autoresíndice de materiabúsqueda de artículos
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Journal of the Chilean Chemical Society

versión On-line ISSN 0717-9707

Resumen

BORQUEZ, CARLOS et al. CHEMICAL FRACTIONS OF Al IN VOLCANIC SOIL AMENDED WITH CELLULOSE WASTE. J. Chil. Chem. Soc. [online]. 2013, vol.58, n.4, pp.2092-2095. ISSN 0717-9707.  http://dx.doi.org/10.4067/S0717-97072013000400042.

The cellulose industry generates a great volume of organic and inorganic waste, one of these wastes are called dreg (D) and grits (G). These residues have a high content of calcium carbonate, positioning them as potential bleachers in acid soils. Due to the important content of Al in the residues, a sequential extraction was done to establish the metal chemical fractions such as exchangeable, adsorbed, organic carbonated, and the ones associated to sulfurs, in incubated samples (2, 4, 8, and 32 days at 60°C) of an Andisol amended soil with Grits, Dregs + Grits and lime in 1, 2 and 3 ton/ha doses. The results revealed that there was a significant increase in the amount of Al in all fractions, in comparison to the control soil. On the other hand the incorporation of these residues through a Dregs (70%) + Grits (30%) mixture provoked a pH increase, always higher than the commercial lime. Finally, the Al present on amended soils was mostly distributed in the residual and carbonated chemical fractions, which would constitute less labile chemical forms to the soil-solution.

Palabras clave : sequential extraction; chemical fractions; cellulose waste (Dregs, Grits); volcanic soil; waste disposal.

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