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ARQ (Santiago)

versión On-line ISSN 0717-6996

ARQ (Santiago)  no.97 Santiago dic. 2017

http://dx.doi.org/10.4067/S0717-69962017000300042 

Works & projects

NU Building. Miraflores, Lima, Perú

Barclay & Crousse Arquitectos

Abstract:

On a privileged site with three fronts - that is, as the prow of an urban block - this apartment building in Lima, Peru, is an example of how a careful design may benefit the city, no matter if the building’s program is private. Or, saying it the other way around, it demonstrates that real estate value does not necessarily go in detriment of architectural quality.

Keywords: apartment; orientation; real estate; city; Peru

Source: © Juan Solano

Figure 1 

Given the privileged situation of an urban area with three fronts, the project responds with a building that doses the openings and the sense of privacy in relation to its views, orientations and the sound intensity of the adjacent urban spaces.

Source: © Juan Solano

Figure 2 

Source: © Juan Solano

Figure 3 

The project articulates the relationship between an interior park and the public street, allowing a continuity between the park’s vegetation and the city through hanging gardens facing the cul-de-sac that allows public access to the park.

Source: © Juan Solano

Figure 4 

Source: © Juan Solano

Figure 5 

Source: © Barclay & Crousse

Figure 6 Croquis detalle balcón 

The facades clearly show the stacking of housing stories through the continuous balconies on its three fronts, which become thinner towards the edges. The different urban configurations and orientations give specificity to each facade.

Source: © Juan Solano

Figure 7 

The longest facade faces east and looks towards the cul-de-sac, where a public parking and the pedestrian access to the building are located. The continuous balconies are slightly curved to mark the main facade. The building is protected with panels of Peruvian marble that act as brise-soleils, shading the apartment’s bedrooms arranged along this sunny front facing the neighboring buildings.

Source: © Barclay & Crousse

Figure 8 Site plan. Published scale 1:1.125 

The facade towards the park, facing south, opens completely through large glass surfaces behind which the living and dining rooms of the large apartments are. The wide continuous balcony is an extension of those interior areas.

Facing north, the facade towards the main street, where the continuous balconies turn to illuminate the halls of the small apartments, closes with extruded windows to protect the bedrooms from the noise of the street. The car access faces the main street, which liberates the ground floor of the cul-de-sac and the park fronts.

The building contains two apartments per floor, however, the distribution allows them to merge into a single large three-front house.

Source: © Barclay & Crousse

Figure 9 Ground level. Published scale 1: 250 

Source: © Barclay & Crousse

Figure 10 Type floor plan with balconies and niches. Published scale 1: 250 

Source: © Barclay & Crousse

Figure 11 West elevation. Published scale 1: 250 

Figure 12 Building image sketch. 

Source: © Barclay & Crousse

Figure 13 Section AA. Published scale 1: 250. 

Source: © Barclay & Crousse

Figure 14 Section BB. Published scale 1: 250. 

Source: © Juan Solano

Figure 15 

NU Building

Architects: Barclay & Crousse (Sandra Barclay, Jean Pierre Crousse)

Collaborator: María Isabel Pineda

Location: Parque Naciones Unidas, Distrito de Miraflores, Lima, Perú

Client: EF Contratistas

Engineering: Ing. Luis Flores

Construction: ef Contratistas

Materials: Reinforced concrete, Peruvian Estela Sombra marble brise-soleil, aluminum windows and tempered glass, white marble floor

Budget: US$ 1.780/ m2

Site surface: 800 m2

Built surface: 8.125 m2

Project year: 2014-2015

Construction year: 2015-2017

Photographs: Juan Solano

*

Sandra Barclay Architect, Ricardo Palma University, Peru, 1990 and Paris-Belleville School of Architecture, 1994. Master in Landscape and Territory, Universidad Diego Portales, Chile, 2013. Associate Professor at Pontificia Universidad Católica del Peru since 2006. She received a Special Mention of the Jury as a curator, together with Jean Pierre Crousse, for the Peruvian Pavilion “Our Amazon Frontline” at the 15th Venice Biennale. Curator for the Peru representation in the 10th Iberoamerican Biennale in São Paulo, 2016. Fellow by the Fulbright Foundation and the Architecture Academy of France.

*

Jean Pierre Crousse Architect, Ricardo Palma University, Perú 1987 and Politécnico di Milano, Italy, 1989. Master in Landscape and Territory, Universidad Diego Portales, Chile, 2013. Visiting Professor at the Master in Design Studies, Harvard University (2015) and Associate Professor at Pontificia Universidad Católica del Peru. Has taught at the Architecture School of Paris-Belleville between 1999 and 2006. He received a Special Mention of the Jury as a curator, together with Sandra Barclay, for the Peruvian Pavilion “Our Amazon Frontline” at the 15th Venice Biennale. Curator for the Peru representation in the 10th Iberoamerican Biennale in São Paulo, 2016. Member of the international jury for the 2016 Mies Crown Hall Award, in Chicago.

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